Shenandoah Bicycle Company https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com Bike Sales, Service, Repair, Rental, Supplies, Pulp Cafe Sat, 19 Nov 2022 17:12:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/images/favicon-2-150x150.png Shenandoah Bicycle Company https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com 32 32 SBC Fall Maintenance Clinic — A 3 PART SERIES https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/clinics/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 23:08:20 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=786 Learn, demystify and get prepared. Bring your bike and questions! Downtown Harrisonburg. Click for more info …

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The next generation of bike lights. In stock. https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/test-ride-the-ibis-exie-today/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 21:25:49 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=2068 OUTBOUND LIGHTING bike lights. Upgrade your night ride! Click for shop hours …

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Keep Your Toes Warm and Dry https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/get-ready-for-the-new-season/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 13:04:09 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=247 Old man winter is coming. Ride on with a new pair of Winter riding boots. In stock.

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A new ebike bridging pedal assist and traditional 👀 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/a-new-kind-of-electric-mountain-bike-%f0%9f%91%80/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 18:33:27 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=2240 The Trek Fuel EXe 9.5 features a carbon frame and a compact motor. Expect a quiet, lively and light ride. Feel the benefits on long climbs and mountain descents. Inquire within …

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Ibis OSO specs https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/ibis-oso-specs/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 19:47:03 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=2279 Ibis OSO specs - in stock at SBC

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Valley Veteran’s Ride for Heroes 2022 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/valley-veterans-ride-for-heroes-2022/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 20:53:11 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=2135

Continue reading]]> A letter to those who pedal, from one who did:

Biking was a refuge. For so many years I approached my after-work rides as if to distance myself from the past, and from the daily reminders of “that which we do to one another.”

I found that if I pedaled like a madman, I could, at least for a while, escape the darkness of my emotions, remove the often present anxiety from my gut by blowing it from my labored lungs, and make the continual hypervigilance simply about watching for cars, trucks, and the farmer’s dogs rather than for the other shoe to drop.

I did this in a time that PTSD was just beginning to be discussed, and well prior to the life saving program developed by the Boulder Crest Foundation – of which I am blessed to have experienced their Warrior PATHH program.

I invite you to join me in helping thousands of veterans and first responders who haven’t yet found their peace. You can do this by riding in the Valley Veteran’s Ride for Heroes, an event that gives all proceeds to the Boulder Crest Foundation. This ride is in its 5th year, and has been developed and coordinated by area Veteran’s of Foreign Wars members.

The event is September the 10th, and it begins, and ends, at Stable Craft Brewing in Waynesboro VA. We veterans would love to see you there. If you cannot ride, we’re happy to share a drink with you, so come hang out. We’re also happy to accept a donation of any size through our website.

Please do take the time to watch the attached video, and please, share it and the event to as many of your fellow cyclists as you can.

Semper Fi,
From an area Marine and retired law enforcement officer

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Why you should explore state parks https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/explore-state-parks/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 18:11:23 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=2091

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Aerial view of Pocahontas State Park

For most of us summer is in full swing which usually leads to more opportunities to get outside and play. When pulling out the map or tapping into your brain trust, think outside the box and research places you have yet to visit in our state or neighboring state (West by God Virginia).  One of the best resources for outdoor exploring is the state park systems within Virginia and West Virginia. This is exactly what I did with my youngest son Carter (11) last week.

For years I’ve heard about Pocahontas State Park, just south of Richmond.  This Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) park, around for a long time, has jumped onto the cycling radar over the past 2 decades because of their increased development of mountain bike trails, 43 miles in total. After some interweb digging, I was super excited when my research found yurt rentals available at Pocahontas State Park, and openings during my planned father/son escape week. Our 3 days and 2 nights of stay at Pocahontas included a little bit of everything including swimming, canoeing, mountain biking and general campground fun.

Functionally speaking, a yurt is a cross between a tent and a cabin

The mountain biking at Pocahontas is fun especially for beginners  and sometimes hard to find in our part of the state. The smooth, flat and flowing mountain bike trails were accessible from our yurt via the park’s natural-surface trail system. This meant our car never moved during our stay at the park. Because the 43 mile mountain bike trail system is compact, it is easy to escape quickly and great for kids who’s tank goes from full to empty in a split second.

I used to think since I live in Harrisonburg and am surrounded by National Forest and National Park, there was not a need for state parks in our area, but my mind has changed.  State parks have something that most National Forests do not offer, more amenities and recreational opportunities in a condensed environment. The National Forest is a different experience, as it should be, and I love it for its unique and remote recreational opportunities.

There are 43 miles of mountain bike trails in Pocahontas State Park

Why am I raving about state parks? Because the newest Virginia State Park, Seven Bends State Park, is close to Harrisonburg!  Having explored Seven Bends State Park recently, I know it is in its infancy, but like a newborn, it will grow into something great.  After our recent visit to Pocahontas State Park, I can see a future vision for Seven Bends State Park: a park with boating opportunities, cabin and yurt rentals and trails for all users.

There are two cycling-related activities that will help grow and mature the Seven Bends State Park; one is the development of the Shenandoah Rail Trail and the other is Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition (SVBC) assistance with trail development and the state’s Recreational Trails Program. These trail opportunities will be an asset for the Shenandoah Valley and our entire state park system.  While the projects are years from completion, I am confident with our help and support, they will come to fruition. Maybe one day, someone will take their son to Seven Bends State Park, stay in a yurt or cabin, ride the trails, and create memories of a lifetime.

Enjoy your summer and think about a state park trip for your next new adventure.

Here’s to summer 2022! – Thomas & Carter Jenkins

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Let’s start building the rest of the FC Trail to connect the new high school NOW https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/friendly-city-trail/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:21:09 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=2049

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When a great project takes way too long to complete, do you still celebrate the result? I think you must! You must celebrate what has been done and push for the next great result not to take as long.

My hat is off to the City of Harrisonburg for completing a major phase of Harrisonburg bike/ped plan, The Friendly City Trail.

If you have not been on the new trail system, I encourage you to get out and experience one — or even all — the legs of Harrisonburg’s newest bike/ped facility.

In a few Saturdays, June 11th to be exact, the Harrisonburg Parks and Rec will hold Pop Ups in the Park at Hillandale Park. This event, at the unofficial City bike park, will be a great chance to bring your bike or walking/running shoes and experience the connectivity provided by the Friendly City Trail. Unlike the remote and secluded feeling you can get in the Rocktown Trails, you will most likely be greeted by others on the Friendly City Trail. Each time I have pedaled or run a portion of this trail, I have enjoyed the experience of seeing others happily using the new paths. The one thing you won’t see is cars!

In all honesty this trail should have been built in 2005 when Harrisonburg High School first opened its doors on Garber Church Road. There were folks in the Harrisonburg bike community pushing for the trail to be built when the foundation was being poured for the high school. Unfortunately those advocates had to wait too long for their kids to be able to enjoy a safe bike ride to high school. Instead, we are celebrating the trail opening 17 years after the completion of the high school, 38 years after the middle school opened its doors, and 3.5 years since Bluestone Elementary was opened. Even though this trail is long overdue, we still must celebrate!

There is a simple question I have continuously asked through construction projects of our schools … We would not open a school that we cannot drive to, so why do we open a school to which we can not safely walk or ride? We need to make the commitment when we decide to build important destinations within our City that we make them connect for all users, not just the car users!

Unfortunately, we have broken ground on the Friendly City’s newest school, Rocktown High School, with no plans to connect this school safely for all users. This thought hit home the other day when I was driving by with my 13 year old son, Ethan. As we drove down South Main Street, I pointed out the new lights hanging above the yet-to-be-built athletic fields, and I said, “maybe you will be playing under those lights soon.” Ethan asked, “will they have a trail?” I had to tell him that there are no plans yet. After seeing how much he enjoys the new trail, I was saddened that he would not be able to pack his soccer ball on his bike to ride to his new high school.

As we enjoy and celebrate the Friendly City Trail, let’s put an arm around our City workers and leaders, give them a squeeze of gratitude, but also give them a pinch to remind them not to wait so long for the next great result.

Open PDF of Friendly City Trail

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Super Bowl Sunday Ride https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/super-bowl-sunday-ride/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 18:51:01 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=1491

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Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2022

2022 — Sunday, Sunday, Sunday!

Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2022

On February 13, 2022, the annual Super Bowl Sunday ride took place. All were welcomed on the ride, and all showed up. There were fat-bikers, gravel riders, and mountain riders … all enjoying the frigid pedal up the Reddish Knob Road. Those willing to brave the previous night’s snowfall experienced a delightful snow-coated landscape. The Shenandoah Bicycle Company crew met at the Hone Quarry Recreation parking area and ventured out to meet up with several enthusiasts enduring the elements. Several groups began to combine once we reached the Saddle and headed out toward Flagpole Knob. The pedal from the saddle to Flagpole would have been nearly impossible if not for the help of some off-roaders who packed in nice tracks for us to pedal through. A pursuit commenced of who could stay up the longest in the tracks, laugh the loudest, and we all encouraged each other to keep going.

Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2022

Once we reached Flagpole knob, more riders from different routes met us, conversed, and shared lots of trail snacks. We all prepared to descend down Red Diamond (Slate Springs), a challenging black diamond descent with technical off-camber sections, sharp turns, and steep shoots, made more difficult by the several inches of snow on the ground. A brief doubletrack ride from Flagpole places you at the start of Red Diamond. From there, we all experienced the loudest laughs and biggest smiles of the day. After Red Diamond, we made the brief pedal back to Hone Quarry, immediately jumping in the car to warm up. Following the ride, the SBC crew all met up for pizza and beer at our favorite spot and regaled each other with our riding stories. Anyway, who won the Super Bowl?

Jake Ross
Super Bowl rider and guest blogger


2021 — Shenandoah Mountain – offering plenty of space to social distance!

With the past year being anything but normal, it seemed more important than ever to try and keep one of the local annual cycling traditions alive. To keep the most un-normal ride going for another year seemed only fitting in these un-normal times. The Super Bowl Sunday ride had to keep living. It had to go on for another year like it has for the past 35+ years. I wanted to make sure the spirit of the folks who started the annual Super Bowl Sunday ride crested the mountain even if their bodies did not. Those spirits are what keep me and others going back to Flagpole each Super Bowl Sunday, regardless of what Mother nature or the mountain has to offer.

Jack and David at the intersection (the split between Flagpole, Reddish Knob and WV),
Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2021

Ever since my first Super Bowl Sunday ride in 1991, the ride has felt like an assault on the big mountain, Shenandoah Mountain. That first year I was scared and intimidated of riding with folks who had a lot more experience than I, folks who I respected in the bike community. Little did I know what really deserved the most respect was the mountain that loomed ahead. The warmth and welcome the riders shared with me that first year inspired me and gave me the needed confidence to climb the mountain. When the road went from pavement to long stretches of ice, I realized we had little to no control, regardless of our riding resume or lack thereof. Watching rider after rider slip and slide along the forest service road to Hone Quarry Ridge made me laugh and wonder what the hell we were doing on this mountain.

That first year of my Super Bowl riding history quickly taught me how much easier it is to go outside of your comfort zone when there are other trusting souls by your side. I learned that the Super Bowl Sunday ride is about battling the mountain as a team, being an army to try and make it to the top of the mountain. Not every year are we victorious; some riders make it to the top and some do not.

Watching out for each other, regardless of knowing the rider, is another part that makes this annual ride so special. I can count on two occasions where riders deviated from the posse, did not take the buddy system to heart, and ended up staying on the mountain well after the Lombardi trophy was lifted. I think this has taught a lot of folks that you don’t mess with the mountain, you don’t assume someone knows where you are, and that you have tools for the elements. We need to do this assault together; socially distant or not, we can look out for each other. But regardless of what happened in the past, a team of old and new riders will come out each year for another assault of Shenandoah Mountain. The 2021 ride had to happen!

In this year of Covid, I know of only seven bike tracks to make the final pitches to Flagpole on Super Bowl Sunday. There is another confirmed case of an assault from the Northeast but that rider had to turn around well before Flagpole. One element that excites me every year on this ride is the rider who is new to the Super Bowl ride tradition. This rider is usually filled with fear, excitement, and unknowingness of what lies ahead. Usually, those new to the ride are not prepared for what the mountain has to offer, but that is why we attack the mountain as a team. It is a group ride, not a race. We win when we are all off the mountain safely.

Leaving the pavement behind,
Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2021

This year only two of us rolled out of the Briery Branch Community Center together. With snowflakes coming to an end and the shimmer of light beginning to shine through the clouds, David and I began our assault on the mountain. Once past Hone Quarry rec area we were joined by fellow SBC’r Jack, and the army grew by 50%. Your first indication of what the mountain has to offer is at the VDOT line where the plows turn around and you learn of the conditions that lay ahead. This VDOT line, ½ mile past Tillman Road, would be our last pavement siting for the next 4 hours. As we slowly made the grind in the tracks of previous 4 wheel vehicles, we felt the peacefulness of snow while soaking in the visual contrast of black and white that blanketed the mountain. When you get to the Briery Branch Dam, the mountain looms ahead, standing tall at 4300+ ft. The time to adjust your wardrobe is now, before you begin the 4 mile wall that takes you to the intersection.

Jack at the intersection (the split between Flagpole, Reddish Knob and WV),
Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2021

When you get to the intersection (the split between Flagpole, Reddish Knob and WV), the mountain gives you another glimpse of what is in store. Here the truck tracks ended and the fresh blanket of snow gave evidence of two riders ahead, forging their way to Flagpole Knob. At this point, our ride went from on the bike to 50% traction control and 50% trudging on foot, but we were not to be stopped. As a few 4×4 vehicles passed, they gazed and wondered. We waved and knew that their tracks would only make our slow going that much harder. The final ¼ mile pitch to Flagpole is when the mountain puts up the biggest battle, but when you have made it this far you will not let 2′ snow drifts stop you from the summit.

The summit can be an hour long layover or a quick 5 minute break. For the 3 of us in our troop, we knew our time on Flagpole would be short.

The wind was picking up and the temperature made you wish for the warmth that the Valley offered. Fortunately we were on Flagpole long enough to be joined by Ken and Eli, whose assault on the mountain started in town. Regardless of your time spent at the highest point of Rockingham County, you always make sure you grab a quick photo. Like Everest or the Moon, you must take this snapshot of time. It will serve as a reminder of why you do the hard stuff.

Jack and David on Flagpole, Super Bowl Sunday Ride, 2021

When it comes to descending off the mountain, this is where many mistakes can be made. The body goes from being a heat generator to a vulnerable creature with a cold fan blowing in your face. The warmest way off the mountain is the quickest and steepest, Slate Spring Trails, aka Red Diamond. Through fear and excitement, this 2 mile elevator shaft will warm any body, making this the best route for the cold and tired. Red Diamond in the snow is a mix of mountain biking, surfing and snowboarding. Like all these sports you need to find the balance and strength to stay upright. For me, these slippery uncontrollable conditions are special and go to the core of what attracted me to mountain biking. To share this descent with David and Jack is another great page in my history of Super Bowl Rides.

When we finally got to the bottom of Red Diamond, where the pitch instantly goes from 30% to 0 we caught up with the first two souls who made tire tracks on the mountain that day. They had just returned from the waterfall trail and were happy to know others were on the mountain. At this point of the ride you pedal out with a sense of camaraderie, a sense of victory, another assault of Shenandoah Mountain on Super Bowl Sunday in the books. The fireroad to Hone Quarry Dam usually offers south facing warmth with a backdrop of Flagpole Knob. You look back and know what a different world it is up there. If you look hard enough I swear you can see 35+ years of mountain bike spirits and souls circling the mountain.

See ya next Super Bowl Sunday on the flanks of Shenandoah Mountain, where we will squeeze in tight for a non socially distant photo!

Thomas Jenkins
Super Bowl rider and lover of Shenandoah Mountain

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PODCAST — Mountain Biking with Thomas Jenkins https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/podcast-by-virginia-outdoor-adventures/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 19:43:08 +0000 https://www.shenandoahbicycle.com/?p=1810

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Thomas Jenkins shows VAOA podcast host Jessica Bowser their route on the Western Slope
Photo courtesy of J. Bowser

Virginia has earned bragging rights as one of the best places for mountain biking on the east coast. From the well-maintained slopes of Massanutten to over 100 miles of backcountry trails within George Washington National Forest, Harrisonburg, Virginia has something for every experienced or beginner rider.

We always joke about whether we spend more time riding or hanging out in the parking lot, eating and drinking. But that’s the mountain biking community, and that’s the Virginia outdoors. It’s about people.
~ Thomas Jenkins, SBC

VAOA podcast host Jessica Bowser enjoys a ride on the Western Slope with Thomas
Photo courtesy of J. Bowser

Fueled by his love for two wheels, Thomas Jenkins, co-owner of Shenandoah Bicycle Company in downtown Harrisonburg, has spent 25 years working to improve trails and transportation in his community. A former mountain biking competitor, Thomas shares how to access the best local trails for all experience levels. Whether you want to cruise a country road or shred on a downhill, Thomas shares the tips and tricks you need to plan your off-road adventure.

Let’s Go!

Listen through VAOA

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